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  • Women, Mat Weaving and Climate Change

    “We weave our Romblon mats and bags at dawn or when it is raining, We cannot weave when it is hot because the “Romblon” material that we use will break”, laments Mansueta Patrias, 55, when asked how climate change affected her bag and romblon- mat making alternative livelihood.

    Mansueta added that unlike before, she can still weave bags or mats until 10:00 o’clock in the morning and continue weaving again at 3:00 o’clock in the afternoon. But now, weaving should start earlier that there are even times when she wakes up at 3:00 o’clock in the morning especially if she gets orders for her products. “Waking up at dawn simply means weaving more bags or mats” quips Mansueta.

    image-02As a member of the Nagkahiusang Kristohanong Mag-uuma sa Maputi (NAKRISMA), a people’s organization at Barangay Maputi, San Isidro, Davao Oriental, Mansueta along with the other men and women members of the organization are the living witnesses of how climate change have affected their community livelihood. Moreover, they come to realize that they ought to protect their forests and plant more trees to mitigate the effect of climate change on their water resources, agro-forestry farms and the production of the Romblon materials for bag and mat weaving.

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Meet “Barry”, The Rare Fish in Mabini

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) never ceases to purport strategic ways to campaign in the conservation of the country’s environment and natural resources particularly on its protected areas. Communication, education and public awareness (CEPA) has been wrapped in varied instruments to connect to people and effectively deliver the message on the importance of conserving nature and its biodiversity.

Mascot is one of those tools. Thus, the creation of “Barry”.

“Barry” the barramundi cod/ humpback grouper (Cromileptes altivelis) mascot was designed to educate the people particularly in the spanning community of Mabini, Compostella Valley Province about the abundance of this rare species within the Mabini Protected Landscape and Seascape (MPLS).

The humpback grouper is a pale-greenish brown, black-spotted fish tagged as naturally rare and high priced both in the international and local market- ranging from P 2,000- P3,000 per kilo.

This species, which is now the flagship species of MPLS, shelters in inner-shelf reefs found underneath the Mabini waters. Although, its global distribution and population has been recorded as decreasing according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), their abundance has recently been recorded in the said protected area, which also reflects its “good condition” coral cover.

Through Barry, the DENR aims to open the eyes of the public on the presence of this rare and vulnerable species and the importance of conserving their home – the Mabini waters. Barry will be made visible during conducts of information drive to encourage the community to value the coastal and marine ecosystem and warn them about the consequences that entails illegal activities such as overfishing.

The caricature was launched in June 2019 at the DENR Marine Center, Sitio Mampising, Brgy. Tagnanan, Mabini, ComVal.