DENR-XI, Indonesian Consulate plan out possible repatriation of apprehended wildlife species

11-13-meeting-with-indonesian-consulate

Officials from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR-XI) and the Indonesian Consulate recently had a meeting to plan out the possible repatriation of wildlife species that were confiscated in Mati, Davao Oriental last April this year. If pushed through, it will be the first in the region and the Philippines to return rescued wildlife species in its country of origin.

It can be recalled that Task Force POGI (Philippine Operations Group on Ivory and Illegal Wildlife Trade) composed of representatives from the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI), DENR, Philippine National Police (PNP) and the Philippine Army (PA) seized different kinds of exotic animals on April 8, 2019 in Barangay Dahican, City of Mati, Davao Oriental. The wildlife species, mostly birds, were said to have come from Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

Task Force POGI was organized by DENR in 2013 to curb poaching and illegal trade of wildlife in the country.

Most of the apprehended wildlife species, composed of birds, mammals and reptiles, are categorized as endangered based on the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). CITES is an international agreement between government and aims to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. This was conceived to regulate the trade of wildlife animals and plants across borders and safeguard certain species from over-exploitation.

In behalf of DENR Assistant Secretary for Field Operations Eastern Mindanao and DENR-XI Regional Executive Director Ruth M. Tawantawan, Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Officer (PENRO) Pablito Ofrecia welcomed Indonesian Consul Henny Mulyani and other representatives from the Indonesian Consulate. After the meeting, the team proceeded to Davao Crocodile Park to check on the said wildlife animals that was turned over there for safekeeping.

Also present are Dr. Esteven U. Toledo of DENR-Biodiversity and Management Bureau (BMB); Chief of the Conservation Development Division (CDD) Myrna Erlinda Arbiol; Chief of the Legal Division Atty. Iris Pauline Tapales; Chief of the Wildlife Permitting Section Jose E. Lechoncito Jr.; and Special Investigator I of the Enforcement Division Brine Dumdum.

#TayoAngKalikasan

News

Avian Migrants found haven in Davao Region

A large number of Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) sighted in Malalag mudflats.  Photo courtesy of DENR XI- Protected Area Management and Biodiversity Conservation Section (PAMCS) team.

Hundreds to thousands of migratory waterbirds were logged during the conduct of Asian Waterbird Census (AWC), a program that aims to monitor and record bird sightings across the globe. It was conducted by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR-XI) in the early weeks of January 2020, in Davao Region’s six (6) monitoring sites – Malalag mudflats in Davao del Sur, Bucana in Davao City, Banay-banay in Davao Oriental and in Panabo, Carmen and Tagum in Davao del Norte.

AWC is an annual event which takes place during the second and third weeks of January.

In Malalag, about a thousand of Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) were sighted, along with hundreds of Pied Stilts (Himantopus leucocephalus) and Whiskered Terns (Chlidonias hybrida). A small number of Great Knot (Calidris tenuirostris), an endangered species was also sighted.

Moreso in Carmen Coastal Wetland, a few of nearly threatened species such as Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) and Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata) were also seen. With them are some Whiskered Terns also flocking in the area. The latter species were also spotted in its neighboring Coastland Wetland in Panabo along with hundreds of Little Egret and Pied Stilts.

Meanwhile in Banay-bay, White-browed Crake (Porzana cinerea) and Wandering Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna javanica) were recorded, just a few compared to the thousands of Pied Stilts that landed in the area. In the same area, a few Philippine Ducks (Anas luzonica), the sole endemic species were also spotted flying overhead. Philippine Ducks is one of our very own families of birds which are unfortunately listed as vulnerable because of its small population.

As Philippines is one of the avian migrants’ flyways or routes in East Asia/Australasia, these avian migrants fly from their origin all the way to the lands of Davao Region to find a better habitat that will suit their need for breeding, feeding and raising their young. They are flying from vast distances including China, Japan, Siberia and other areas around the world that has winter season. These migrant birds travel beyond their country’s borders in search for warmer and safer refuge where they can also find sufficient food resources.

As a warm welcome to these visitors, may we all refrain from touching or harming them. Just let them fly freely.

#MigratoryBirds

Photo Releases

Other Links

  • office-of-the-president

  •   
  • gov

                                *EMB    *MGB    *FMB    * PAWB    * LMB   * ERDB